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Whitney Pipkin

Freelance Journalist

Washington, DC area

Whitney Pipkin

A staff writer for the Chesapeake Bay Journal and a freelance journalist focused on food, farms and the environment. Her freelance work appears nationally in The Washington Post, National Geographic, Smithsonian Magazine and Civil Eats and in regional publications like Virginia Living, Northern Virginia and Arlington magazines and the Delmarva Farmer. Pipkin served as guest editor for Edible DC’s summer 2016 issue focused on how to eat with the Chesapeake Bay in mind.

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Dock to Dish brings seafood directly to the restaurant door

The Salt Line executive chef Kyle Bailey, right, will be the first in the Washington area to get deliveries from Dock to Dish, which applies the weekly farm box model to seafood. With Bailey are members of his kitchen team, Mike Haney and Mike O’Brien. A home cook might have been put off by the plump egg sacks that spilled out of a recent delivery of white perch.
The Washington Post Link to Story
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Editor of EdibleDC's Sustainability Issue

I guest edited EdibleDC's first Sustainability issue in the Summer of 2016. The content of the entire magazine, including several pieces I wrote for it, focused on the Chesapeake Bay and how to eat with its best in mind. Flip through the issue here.
Edible DC Magazine Link to Story
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Eat the Enemy: How an unwelcome predator is becoming dinner

Rocky Rice couldn’t help but notice the growing number of blue catfish eating their way through the Potomac River he’s fished since boyhood. He first started seeing a few small catfish in his crab pots and then noticed the bigger ones gaining their run of the river, including the 70-pounder he once netted.
Northern Virginia Magazine Link to Story
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Land-farmed salmon: Coming (temporarily) to a restaurant or store near you

Still have farmed salmon crossed off your short list of eco-friendly fish? A local version that’s available for a limited time in the Washington area could temporarily rewrite your rules. Most farmed salmon are raised in open nets or pens in the ocean, where their waste and potential to introduce parasites, diseases or non-native fish to the wild present serious environmental concerns.
The Washington Post Link to Story
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Blue catfish: Overabundant, and the key to a new nonprofit group’s mission

The name “blue catfish” doesn’t carry the same villainous ring as that of its invasive counterpart, the snakehead, but the whiskered fish are proving even uglier for the Chesapeake Bay ecosystem. Having vacuumed their way through local flora and fauna — even some precious Maryland blue crabs — they now outnumber other fish 3-1 in bay tributaries.
The Washington Post Link to Story

About

Whitney Pipkin

Whitney Pipkin is a staff writer for the Chesapeake Bay Journal and a freelance journalist focused on food, farms and the environment. Her freelance work appears nationally in The Washington Post, National Geographic, Smithsonian Magazine and Civil Eats and in regional publications like Virginia Living, Northern Virginia and Arlington magazines and the Delmarva Farmer. Pipkin served as guest editor for Edible DC’s summer 2016 issue focused on how to eat with the Chesapeake Bay in mind.
A wife and mother based in Northern Virginia, she occasionally blogs about food, family, fitness and faith (how's that for alliteration?) at ThinkAboutEat.com.