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Whitney Pipkin

Freelance Journalist

Washington, DC area

Whitney Pipkin

A staff writer for the Chesapeake Bay Journal
and a freelance journalist focused on food, farms
and the environment. Pipkin's freelance work appears
nationally in The Washington Post, National Geographic, NPR, Smithsonian Magazine and Civil Eats and in regional publications such as Virginia Living, Northern Virginia and Arlington magazines and the Delmarva Farmer. Pipkin has served as guest editor for Edible DC’s fall 2018 and summer 2016 issues.

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The elusive parent date night: Why you need it, and how to make it happen

Going on a bona fide date with my husband used to be as simple as making an Open Table reservation and taking a night off from the kitchen. But now that we have a pair of young children underfoot, getting out the door comes at such a steep cost —...
The Washington Post Link to Story
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Food Tank Panel: Fireside Chat w/ Leading Farmers Organizations [Food Tank Summit]

Fireside Chat featuring Roger Johnson, President, National Farmers Union, Lindsey Lusher Shute, Executive Director & Co-Founder, National Young Farmers Coalition; and Mark Poeschl, CEO, National FFA Organization. Moderated by Whitney Pipkin, Reporter, the Chesapeake Bay Journal. Discussion held at the 2018 Food Tank Summit held February 28th in partnership with George Washington University, World Resources Institute, the National Farmers Union, the National FFA Organization, the National Young Farmers Coalition, Grist, Mother Jones, and Edible DC.
Food Tank Summit Link to Story
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A Peas Offering For The Dairy Aisle: Can This Milk Alternative Rival The Real Deal?

The nearly $8 billion dairy-alternatives market is expected to double in size over the next four years, thanks in part to the growing number of people avoiding cow's milk. But, even if former milk drinkers can get over the differences in taste, there's one front on which the almond, cashew and coconut cannot compete with the cow: protein.
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'The Hardest Bakery Possible': Reinventing The Meaning Of 'Whole Grain'

Jonathan Bethony admits the breads he'll be churning out at Seylou Bakery & Mill, which just opened this month in Washington, D.C., might not appeal to everyone. The dark crusts of his pain au levain have a charred appearance and complex flavors to match their hue. Inside the loaves, a toothsome chewiness gives way to the tang of sourdough and a taste that can only be described as distinctly wheat-y.
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Dock to Dish brings seafood directly to the restaurant door

The Salt Line executive chef Kyle Bailey, right, will be the first in the Washington area to get deliveries from Dock to Dish, which applies the weekly farm box model to seafood. With Bailey are members of his kitchen team, Mike Haney and Mike O’Brien. A home cook might have been put off by the plump egg sacks that spilled out of a recent delivery of white perch.
The Washington Post Link to Story
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How to Farm a Forest—and Feed a Neighborhood

A forest garden helps prove the theory that fertile, well-maintained understories can produce as many calories per acre as a field of wheat. The dollop of acorn gel with fermented sweet potato greens looked like sustenance from an episode of Survivor when a volunteer first offered it to me, plated on a single shiso leaf.
National Geographic Link to Story
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Garbage Can Teach Us a Lot About Food Waste

This month, in a first-of-its-kind study, the nonprofit Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) will begin digging through the trash bins of residents and businesses in three American cities. Because it turns out we don't actually know that much about food waste. We know that Americans waste about 36 million tons of food a year, but we don’t know the nitty-gritty details about individual behavior.
Smithsonian Magazine Link to Story
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Why This Food Bank is Turning Away Junk Food

The largest hunger-fighting organization in the nation’s capital has put food-donating retailers on notice: no more candy, sugary sodas, or sheet cakes. As key as donations are to the nonprofit’s bottom line, the Capital Area Food Bank recently told retailers that, beginning this fall, it won’t accept free food that comes at a cost to recipients—many of whom struggle with obesity and diabetes as much as hunger.
Civil Eats Link to Story
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Brass Tacks: How Seed Suppliers Pick Their Fields

Twice a year, a handful of representatives from as many seed companies gather ‘round a toy-sized tractor to draw numbers from it. It’s the NFL draft of the seed-growing world tucked into a fertile corner of Washington state–and it’s pretty mild-mannered, in comparison. The numbers drawn from the tractor determine who gets first pick in the field, represented by a sprawling map on the wall, marked with–you guessed it–brass thumbtacks and red yarn, the same way it has been done for the last 60 years.
National Geographic Link to Story
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Food Access Advocates Walk The Long Walk ... To The Nearest Grocery Store

Two miles isn't too far to march for a worthy cause, as people are prone to do in the nation's capital. But it is a long way to walk for groceries. That's the impression organizers of a recent Grocery Walk in Washington, D.C.' s Anacostia neighborhood wanted to invoke when they gathered nearly 500 people to walk that far — wielding carrots and "food justice" signs — in the latest effort to address the intractable problem of food deserts.
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The Woman Who Helped the Military Cut Down on Meat

When she first started canvassing the country seven years ago, urging school districts, military bases and other big buyers to buy and serve less meat, Kristie Middleton got used to people rolling their eyes at her. Years before the federal government and physicians began suggesting that we do just that, the idea of eating fewer (or smaller) burgers was unpopular.
Civil Eats Link to Story
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Food Policy in the Balance

If the past two weeks are any indication, federal policies that have been the status quo for years are now vulnerable to a stroke of the new administration’s pen. With policy changes taking place at breakneck speed in Washington, there is no certainty with respect to laws that have made the U.S. food system safer, healthier, and more sustainable.
Civil Eats Link to Story

About

Whitney Pipkin

Whitney Pipkin is a staff writer for the Chesapeake Bay Journal and a freelance journalist focused on food, farms and the environment. Her freelance work appears nationally in The Washington Post, National Geographic, Smithsonian Magazine and Civil Eats and in regional publications like Virginia Living, Northern Virginia and Arlington magazines and the Delmarva Farmer. Pipkin has served as guest editor for Edible DC’s fall 2018 and summer 2016 issues.
A wife and mother based in Northern Virginia, she occasionally blogs about food, family, fitness and faith (how's that for alliteration?) at ThinkAboutEat.com.