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Whitney Pipkin

Freelance Journalist

Washington, DC area

Whitney Pipkin

A staff writer for the Chesapeake Bay Journal
and a freelance journalist focused on food, farms
and the environment. Pipkin's freelance work appears
nationally in The Washington Post, National Geographic, NPR, Smithsonian Magazine and Civil Eats and in regional publications such as Virginia Living, Northern Virginia and Arlington magazines and the Delmarva Farmer. Pipkin has served as guest editor for Edible DC’s fall 2018 and summer 2016 issues.

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Freshwater bivalves flexing their muscles as water filterers

Oysters are in many ways the restoration darlings of the Chesapeake Bay cleanup effort. Touted for multiple benefits — as edible, water-filtering moneymakers — oysters attract both enthusiasm and funding to promote their recovery. But the popularity of oysters often overshadows the water-cleansing role of other filter feeders such as mussels.
Bay Journal Link to Story
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Managed grazing cultivates new believers

A Maryland dairyman felt like a lone wolf when he started down the decade-long path to nourishing his animals and his land differently. A Virginia cattleman said his neighbors laughed at him, and a Pennsylvania rancher agreed. No other farmer they knew was using grazing techniques this way. “Now,” said Mike Phillips, a farmer in Rockingham County, VA, “the ones who laughed are asking how we’re doing it.”.
Bay Journal Link to Story
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Food Tank Panel: Fireside Chat w/ Leading Farmers Organizations [Food Tank Summit]

Fireside Chat featuring Roger Johnson, President, National Farmers Union, Lindsey Lusher Shute, Executive Director & Co-Founder, National Young Farmers Coalition; and Mark Poeschl, CEO, National FFA Organization. Moderated by Whitney Pipkin, Reporter, the Chesapeake Bay Journal. Discussion held at the 2018 Food Tank Summit held February 28th in partnership with George Washington University, World Resources Institute, the National Farmers Union, the National FFA Organization, the National Young Farmers Coalition, Grist, Mother Jones, and Edible DC.
Food Tank Summit Link to Story
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Alexandria’s Sewage Problem Is Dividing Virginia Legislators

Appeared on The Kojo Nnamdi Show March 30 to discuss Alexandria's sewer overflow issues. The City of Alexandria has had this problem for over 15 years. When a storm came through and overwhelmed the sewage and storm water system, many homes received sewer backup in their basements - even the mayor was affected. He had just finished a renovation of his basement only to receive 3 feet of sewage destroying all the work. View more of my writing on the subject for the Bay Journal here: http://www.bayjournal.com/blog/post/governor_proposes_giving_alexandria_more_time_to_fix_sewage_overflows
The Kojo Nnamdi Show Link to Story
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Your Food Waste CSA, Delivered

The avocados are too small. The apples don’t stand up on their own. The carrots have a little too much, shall we say, character. But Hungry Harvest's customers don’t seem to mind. In fact, wanting such foods to go to good use is one of the reasons they signed up to receive a weekly share of the so-called“ ugly produce” from the Columbia, Maryland–based startup.
Edible DC Link to Story
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Counting chickens: Poultry farms on VA Shore breed resistance

One frigid evening this winter, 170 people crowded into a high school auditorium in Onley, a small town on Virginia’s rural Eastern Shore. They didn’t come to see a student theater production or watch a basketball game between rival schools — but to talk about chickens. Many came to ply state regulators with concerns about local water quality and their health amid the poultry industry’s rapid growth on their stretch of the Delmarva Peninsula.
Bay Journal Link to Story
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The Woman Who Helped the Military Cut Down on Meat

When she first started canvassing the country seven years ago, urging school districts, military bases and other big buyers to buy and serve less meat, Kristie Middleton got used to people rolling their eyes at her. Years before the federal government and physicians began suggesting that we do just that, the idea of eating fewer (or smaller) burgers was unpopular.
Civil Eats Link to Story
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Removing a Dam Can Be a Net Win for the Planet

Once trumpeted as river-taming, energy-producing feats of engineering, America’s dams have become the subject of introspection and, in a growing number of cases, demolition. The country spent millions to erect an estimated 80,000 of these concrete walls across rivers all over the country, but now a variety of interest groups are rallying to remove many of them, even if it happens at great cost.
Smithsonian Magazine Link to Story
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This Bird Didn’t Start the Fires, But It May Need Them to Survive

Two hundred years ago, the Kirtland’s warbler had its pick of the jack pine forest when it came to choosing nesting grounds. Regular wildfires sweeping through the sandy forests of Michigan, where the majority of these birds still nest, kept the trees not too tall and not too short—just the way the warbler liked them.
Smithsonian Magazine Link to Story

About

Whitney Pipkin

Whitney Pipkin is a staff writer for the Chesapeake Bay Journal and a freelance journalist focused on food, farms and the environment. Her freelance work appears nationally in The Washington Post, National Geographic, Smithsonian Magazine and Civil Eats and in regional publications like Virginia Living, Northern Virginia and Arlington magazines and the Delmarva Farmer. Pipkin has served as guest editor for Edible DC’s fall 2018 and summer 2016 issues.
A wife and mother based in Northern Virginia, she occasionally blogs about food, family, fitness and faith (how's that for alliteration?) at ThinkAboutEat.com.