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Whitney Pipkin

Freelance Journalist

Washington, DC area

Whitney Pipkin

A staff writer for the Chesapeake Bay Journal
and a freelance journalist focused on food, farms
and the environment. Pipkin's freelance work appears
nationally in The Washington Post, National Geographic, NPR, Smithsonian Magazine and Civil Eats and in regional publications such as Virginia Living, Northern Virginia and Arlington magazines and the Delmarva Farmer. Pipkin has served as guest editor for Edible DC’s fall 2018 and summer 2016 issues.

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Virginia Gets Its First Sake Brewery

Room temperature, in a shot glass, at a sushi bar. That’s the way most Americans have experienced sake, a Japanese alcohol made from fermented rice. But the owners of the North American Sake Brewery, which opened in Charlottesville this year, want to change that. “When you have really good, cold, craft sake, it’s just eye opening,” says Jeremy Goldstein, the brewery’s co-founder.
Virginia Living Link to Story
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Smoke & Star Power

Myron Mixon’s Pitmaster Barbeque brings the heat to Alexandria. Joe Corey is holding a slice of brisket by each end and gently tugging. He wants to show off the “accordion-like” texture and thick, pink smoke ring that, he says, would earn this piece of meat top marks in any one of the barbecue competitions he has judged over the past two decades.
Virginia Living Link to Story
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Get It While It’s Hot

If you see a plume of smoke rising on a Saturday morning in the Shenandoah Valley, follow it. Odds are it will lead you to a pile of chicken barbecued low ‘n slow over a charcoal pit by someone like Rafe Rohrer. “Roll down your window and let your nose lead you to it,” says Rohrer, 65, who’s been turning birds on the grill for years as a member of the Montezuma Ruritan Club.
Virginia Living Link to Story
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Rethinking School Lunch

We challenged three chefs-with-kids to make over school lunch—and tell us why it isn’t as easy as it sounds. Spooning rosemary-infused honey onto apple slices was getting every ounce of Lucia García’s attention, until her father reminded her of the time. “Lulu, you need to go faster,” Ruben García said, lightheartedly, reminding his 9-year-old sous chef that their meal would need to be plated in a few minutes.
Edible DC Link to Story
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Guest Editor, Edible DC Fall 2018

I served as Guest Editor of the Fall 2018 issue of Edible DC, curating, organizing, editing and writing much of its content.
Edible DC Link to Story
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How the commonwealth’s brewery scene climbed the ranks

Raise a glass to the government that’s helped the state’s brewed options abound. When Jonathan Staples put a half-hearted offer on a derelict horse farm in Lucketts, turning it into a hops-growing hub for the county’s fast-growing beer industry was not in his playbook. The restaurant industry veteran, who also owns Richmond’s James River Distillery, mentioned to Loudoun County officials that he wanted to grow hops on some of the 60-acre farm, a fragrant botanical to use in the distillery’s gin.
Northern Virginia Magazine Link to Story
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Garden Glory

The kitchen garden at Pippin Hill Farm and Vineyards is as beautiful as it is bountiful. Find Diane Burns watering the gardens that fan out from Pippin Hill Farm & Vineyards’ tasting room in North Garden, and you’re in for a treat. Pick her brain about what’s on the menu that day—odds are she plucked the ingredients from the grounds that morning—or, better yet, glean tips on how to grow food more beautifully at home.
Virginia Living Link to Story
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HOW THE DISTRICT IS CURBING FOOD WASTE

When Josh Singer first started turning food scraps into compost inside the Beltway, he ran into the usual suspects: rats, smells and angry neighbors. Since then, “I’ve spent the last decade trying to figure out the best ways to do it,” says Singer, a community garden specialist with the District’s Department of Parks and Recreation who saw the potential for compost to turn food waste into a resource for urban farms and gardens.
Edible DC Link to Story
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Why You Should Be Eating More Seafood

Steering clear of fish for environmental and health reasons? The bigger risk might be not getting enough of it. On a recent night out at an Arlington restaurant, Linda Cornish asked her server which fish dish he’d suggest, though she was already leaning toward a blueberry-sauced salmon on the menu.
Arlington Magazine Link to Story
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The secret sauce in this ketchup? Vegetables.

When it comes to getting the pickiest palates to try new foods, parents have a few tried-and-true tricks. They can finely chop (or, better yet, Vitamix) the new ingredient into a smoothie or casserole, only to tell the child that she actually loves beets—because she just ate one. Or they can drape the new item in that most familiar and beloved of children’s food groups: ketchup.
Northern Virginia Magazine Link to Story
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Protecting the Spaces Where Local is Grown

There’s an imperceptible edge when you leave the city, where the skyline gives way to subdivisions and then to larger and larger patches of verdant fields. Perhaps you’ve watched with a sigh as the scenery changed on your way to a wedding, winery or U-pick patch. But if you buy produce at a farmers market, this transition area is also where it was most likely grown—and it is no small feat to ensure that produce will still be grown there in the future. This ring of land just beyond the District’s suburbs is a patchwork of open spaces surrounding still-pressing development. A growing portion of it is being protected from development by a mix of government and private programs to preserve farmland or open spaces, but their success can be subject to the whims of a new county board or the funding of a state program.
Edible DC Magazine Link to Story
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Editor of EdibleDC's Sustainability Issue

I guest edited EdibleDC's first Sustainability issue in the Summer of 2016. The content of the entire magazine, including several pieces I wrote for it, focused on the Chesapeake Bay and how to eat with its best in mind. Flip through the issue here.
Edible DC Magazine Link to Story

About

Whitney Pipkin

Whitney Pipkin is a staff writer for the Chesapeake Bay Journal and a freelance journalist focused on food, farms and the environment. Her freelance work appears nationally in The Washington Post, National Geographic, Smithsonian Magazine and Civil Eats and in regional publications like Virginia Living, Northern Virginia and Arlington magazines and the Delmarva Farmer. Pipkin has served as guest editor for Edible DC’s fall 2018 and summer 2016 issues.
A wife and mother based in Northern Virginia, she occasionally blogs about food, family, fitness and faith (how's that for alliteration?) at ThinkAboutEat.com.