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Whitney Pipkin

Freelance Journalist

Washington, DC area

Whitney Pipkin

A staff writer for the Chesapeake Bay Journal and a freelance journalist focused on food, farms and the environment. Her freelance work appears nationally in The Washington Post, National Geographic, Smithsonian Magazine and Civil Eats and in regional publications like Virginia Living, Northern Virginia and Arlington magazines and the Delmarva Farmer. Pipkin served as guest editor for Edible DC’s summer 2016 issue focused on how to eat with the Chesapeake Bay in mind.

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Briana Scurry Talks Concussions

The Olympian and Women's World Cup champion on the brain injury that ended her goalkeeping career. And kickstarted her role as advocate. It’s easy to imagine Briana Scurry defending a soccer goal, although it has been years since she did it for a living. After a decade and a half of goalkeeping at the highest echelons of women’s soccer, she still shows certain reflexes, like the way her hands automatically fan open as she talks.
Arlington Magazine Link to Story
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Protecting the Spaces Where Local is Grown

There’s an imperceptible edge when you leave the city, where the skyline gives way to subdivisions and then to larger and larger patches of verdant fields. Perhaps you’ve watched with a sigh as the scenery changed on your way to a wedding, winery or U-pick patch. But if you buy produce at a farmers market, this transition area is also where it was most likely grown—and it is no small feat to ensure that produce will still be grown there in the future. This ring of land just beyond the District’s suburbs is a patchwork of open spaces surrounding still-pressing development. A growing portion of it is being protected from development by a mix of government and private programs to preserve farmland or open spaces, but their success can be subject to the whims of a new county board or the funding of a state program.
Edible DC Magazine Link to Story
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Editor of EdibleDC's Sustainability Issue

I guest edited EdibleDC's first Sustainability issue in the Summer of 2016. The content of the entire magazine, including several pieces I wrote for it, focused on the Chesapeake Bay and how to eat with its best in mind. Flip through the issue here.
Edible DC Magazine Link to Story
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The Whole Hog: A Waste Not, Want Not Approach to Local Food

With breeds like Ossabaw, Mulefoot and Large Black, Spring House Farm’s pigs are the makings of farm-to-table fables. But trucking the immense black pigs from the farm in Lovettsville to the butcher to the chefs—most of whom wanted chops, not noses or tails—became a money-losing endeavor a few years in, says farmer Andrew Crush.
Northern Virginia Magazine Link to Story
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How ethics guidelines can catch freelancers by surprise

Freelancers aspiring to write for NPR might start by taking a spin through its ethics handbook, lengthy as it is. That’s because the “living document,” available on NPR’s website, pertains to contract workers as much as staffers — and could have implications for freelancers’ broader suites of work, says Mark Memmott, who oversees the 20-section handbook as standards and practices editor.
Current & Contently Link to Story
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Opening Act: The Bittersweet Intro of an Aperitif

slightly bitter, slightly sweet, fully invigorating—of the aperitif. Just as taste buds grow to love the bitter and bracing later in life, our cocktail culture is coming of age—and seeking something a bit more bittersweet. The signposts are appearing on menus and behind bars across the region under a categorical heading the French tell us we’ve been ignoring for far too long: Aperitifs.
Virginia Living Link to Story
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SOIL THERAPY: Red Wiggler Farm nurtures people with disabilities

Tyler Cunningham has been running the mower at Red Wiggler Farm for 15 years, and he’s good at it. He can mow back overgrown edges and carve narrow strips into fields of hairy vetch and rye, defining rows for spring plantings, with ease. He can even fix the mower when it breaks, no small feat for a 56-year-old with developmental disabilities, one who’s found a career and identity as a farmer. Practically predicting the locavore movement that would make its community-supported agriculture (CSA) shares a hit, the farm was founded in 1996 based on two tenets: that people with developmental disabilities need meaningful employment and that there’s nothing more meaningful than growing food for people…
Edible DC Magazine Link to Story
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Behind Closed Doors: The Airlie Center

When an unexpected snowstorm caused a couple to pull off the highway just north of Warrenton one Saturday night in February, they followed the signs to Airlie. A couple of years ago, they wouldn’t have made it up the driveway of the sprawling retreat center, past the signs warning “private property” and “registered guests only.”.
Virginia Living Link to Story
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Don’t Sit Baby in the Corner

Smile, leave a big tip and other notes on dining with an infant from Whitney Pipkin. There are two types of eating-out experiences when you bring a newborn along: the ones in which the baby falls asleep in the car seat on the way to dinner and snoozes soundly through the entire meal, and the ones in which she does not.
Northern Virginia Magazine Link to Story
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Can local food feed the world?

A wide grin spreads across Marland Buckner's face as he walks toward an overgrown apple orchard. Clusters of ginger-gold spheres dot the trees' upper branches, waiting to be picked. A small herd of goats is basking in the midsummer sun just beyond their shade, taking a break from their daily duty of eating whatever apples and greenery they can reach on hind legs. Shaking hands with the three farmers he's hired to care for these animals and this land, known as ForeverView Farms, Buckner steps back to breathe in the view, letting the city and its abstract food policies give way to the tangible scene before him. "So this is how local feeds the world," he says, gesturing to the nearly 40-acre piece of land he bought two years ago.
Edible DC Magazine Link to Story
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HEAVY DUTY: Obesity's Threat to National Security

Citing youth obesity as a threat to national security, military leaders hope to turn the tide, starting with schools.
American Legion Magazine Link to Story
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Urban Farming Grows in Arlington

Behind the scenes with the local growers and garden experts who are cultivating this DIY trend in Northern Virginia. Standing on a tidy brick patio in Fairlington, gardening consultant Rebecca Carpenter explains why the homeowner will be ripping out her rosebushes this year. Pretty as their petals can be, the roses just don’t compare to the tomatoes, peppers and leafy greens that will sprout, midsummer, from the thick border of dirt beds that is slowly taking over the home’s postage-stamp-size yard.
Arlington Magazine Link to Story

About

Whitney Pipkin

Whitney Pipkin is a staff writer for the Chesapeake Bay Journal and a freelance journalist focused on food, farms and the environment. Her freelance work appears nationally in The Washington Post, National Geographic, Smithsonian Magazine and Civil Eats and in regional publications like Virginia Living, Northern Virginia and Arlington magazines and the Delmarva Farmer. Pipkin served as guest editor for Edible DC’s summer 2016 issue focused on how to eat with the Chesapeake Bay in mind.
A wife and mother based in Northern Virginia, she occasionally blogs about food, family, fitness and faith (how's that for alliteration?) at ThinkAboutEat.com.