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Whitney Pipkin

Freelance Journalist

Washington, DC area

Whitney Pipkin

A staff writer for the Chesapeake Bay Journal
and a freelance journalist focused on food, farms
and the environment. Pipkin's freelance work appears
nationally in The Washington Post, National Geographic, NPR, Smithsonian Magazine and Civil Eats and in regional publications such as Virginia Living, Northern Virginia and Arlington magazines and the Delmarva Farmer. Pipkin has served as guest editor for Edible DC’s fall 2018 and summer 2016 issues.

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Livestock fencing needs to pick up pace in Shenandoah Valley

Time seems to slow down in the Shenandoah Valley, where the pastoral act of raising livestock for a living appears as unchanged by the years as the emerald-green hills on either side of Interstate 81. But almost a decade has passed since Virginia first set a goal to have farmers build fences along nearly every Chesapeake Bay-bound stream that livestock could otherwise access in the state.
Bay Journal Link to Story
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How to eat with your morals, while staying on budget

CAVA, Taco Bamba and Haute Dogs have figured out the formula to provide health-conscious, fast-casual food at an affordable price. Technically, people could braise short ribs, grill chicken souvlaki and roast a seasonal mix of vegetables by 5 p.m. so their kids can have choices on the way to hockey practice—but it’s not likely.
Northern Virginia Magazine Link to Story
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The South had something worth saving

Rick Middleton didn’t fancy himself an environmental lawyer when he graduated from Yale Law School in 1971. That category didn’t exist. The United States had only just commemorated its first Earth Day, and the future founder of the Southern Environmental Law Center still felt like a fish out of water in New England’s semi-industrial corridor, pining for the bucolic valleys around his Alabama hometown of Birmingham.
Bay Journal Link to Story
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The Lucketts Ladies

“Sorry for the mess,” Suzanne “Suze” Eblen says as I step across the threshold into the Design House at The Old Lucketts Store north of Leesburg. “We’re in the throes of redecorating.”. I chuckle, imagining her saying the same phrase any day of the week about the house she and her business partner, Amy Whyte, have overhauled 140 times so far, selling everything within its walls at weekend events 10 times a year.
Virginia Living Link to Story
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White Horse Mountain worth the millions paid to protect it

Hugging the slow s-curves of road winding into a mountainous sliver of West Virginia’s Hampshire County, I remembered why they call this portion of the Chesapeake Bay watershed “wild” — and why clean water advocates were desperate to keep it that way.
Bay Journal Link to Story
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Female (Up)Rising - Cover Story

How women scaling the ranks could make the industry a friendlier place to work — and not just for themselves.
Edible DC Link to Story
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When Self-Pity Raids Fellowship

I don’t say it as I walk through the doors of our lovely church and greet our fellow saints every Sunday morning. if I got the kids out the door and the limping dog fed and the home group meal made while my husband was off at another drill weekend—it’s likely I’m thinking it. For years, I thought the problem with this scenario was that the God of the universe didn’t swoop down to help everything go perfectly on Sunday morning.
Deeply Rooted Magazine Link to Story
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Virginia Gets Its First Sake Brewery

Room temperature, in a shot glass, at a sushi bar. That’s the way most Americans have experienced sake, a Japanese alcohol made from fermented rice. But the owners of the North American Sake Brewery, which opened in Charlottesville this year, want to change that. “When you have really good, cold, craft sake, it’s just eye opening,” says Jeremy Goldstein, the brewery’s co-founder.
Virginia Living Link to Story
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Beyond Garnish: How Science Helps An Indoor Farm Amp Up Flower Flavor

From inside the overly-lit interior of a 1960s strip mall, software programs and science are helping an urban farm fire up the flavor of fennel fronds and control the size of nasturtium leaves. By carefully monitoring each variable and its impact on the way a plant tastes, looks and grows, Fresh Impact Farms is inching closer to its goal: delivering edible flowers and herbs catered to the taste preferences of top-tier chefs.
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Making outdoor spaces more inviting, accessible to all

When Kevin Bryan visits Rock Creek Park near his home in the District of Columbia, it reminds him of what’s possible. He sees families from many ethnic backgrounds hosting barbecues and birthday parties at picnic tables. Dog walkers wind their way through wooded trails while cyclists “look like they are training for the Tour de France” as they hug the curves of the park’s paved roads.
Bay Journal Link to Story
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Freshwater bivalves flexing their muscles as water filterers

Oysters are in many ways the restoration darlings of the Chesapeake Bay cleanup effort. Touted for multiple benefits — as edible, water-filtering moneymakers — oysters attract both enthusiasm and funding to promote their recovery. But the popularity of oysters often overshadows the water-cleansing role of other filter feeders such as mussels.
Bay Journal Link to Story
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Smoke & Star Power

Myron Mixon’s Pitmaster Barbeque brings the heat to Alexandria. Joe Corey is holding a slice of brisket by each end and gently tugging. He wants to show off the “accordion-like” texture and thick, pink smoke ring that, he says, would earn this piece of meat top marks in any one of the barbecue competitions he has judged over the past two decades.
Virginia Living Link to Story

About

Whitney Pipkin

Whitney Pipkin is a staff writer for the Chesapeake Bay Journal and a freelance journalist focused on food, farms and the environment. Her freelance work appears nationally in The Washington Post, National Geographic, Smithsonian Magazine and Civil Eats and in regional publications like Virginia Living, Northern Virginia and Arlington magazines and the Delmarva Farmer. Pipkin has served as guest editor for Edible DC’s fall 2018 and summer 2016 issues.
A wife and mother based in Northern Virginia, she occasionally blogs about food, family, fitness and faith (how's that for alliteration?) at ThinkAboutEat.com.