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Whitney Pipkin

Freelance Journalist

Washington, DC area

Whitney Pipkin

A staff writer for the Chesapeake Bay Journal and a freelance journalist focused on food, farms and the environment. Her freelance work appears nationally in The Washington Post, National Geographic, Smithsonian Magazine and Civil Eats and in regional publications like Virginia Living, Northern Virginia and Arlington magazines and the Delmarva Farmer. Pipkin served as guest editor for Edible DC’s summer 2016 issue focused on how to eat with the Chesapeake Bay in mind.

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The "Top Chef" of DC's Food Policy

If you've read anything about the District's food policy council since it was christened last year, it might have been that the gregarious celebrity chef Spike Mendelsohn was named its chair. But behind the curtain of local government, a red-bespectacled urban planner is putting that council's wishes into action—one email at a time.
Edible DC Magazine Link to Story
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Alexandria’s Sewage Problem Is Dividing Virginia Legislators

Appeared on The Kojo Nnamdi Show March 30 to discuss Alexandria's sewer overflow issues. The City of Alexandria has had this problem for over 15 years. When a storm came through and overwhelmed the sewage and storm water system, many homes received sewer backup in their basements - even the mayor was affected. He had just finished a renovation of his basement only to receive 3 feet of sewage destroying all the work. View more of my writing on the subject for the Bay Journal here: http://www.bayjournal.com/blog/post/governor_proposes_giving_alexandria_more_time_to_fix_sewage_overflows
The Kojo Nnamdi Show Link to Story
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Uyghur Dishes Are Hot at Queen Amannisa

Head to Crystal City for a taste of this lesser-known cuisine hailing from Western China. When we think of Chinese dumplings or other ubiquitous mainstays in American take-out culture, pork features prominently. That is, unless the cook behind it hails from a Chinese Muslim minority group—one with roots along the Silk Road that long ago replaced pork with a dizzying confluence of other flavors.
Arlington Magazine Link to Story
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Briana Scurry Talks Concussions

The Olympian and Women's World Cup champion on the brain injury that ended her goalkeeping career. And kickstarted her role as advocate. It’s easy to imagine Briana Scurry defending a soccer goal, although it has been years since she did it for a living. After a decade and a half of goalkeeping at the highest echelons of women’s soccer, she still shows certain reflexes, like the way her hands automatically fan open as she talks.
Arlington Magazine Link to Story
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Food Policy in the Balance

If the past two weeks are any indication, federal policies that have been the status quo for years are now vulnerable to a stroke of the new administration’s pen. With policy changes taking place at breakneck speed in Washington, there is no certainty with respect to laws that have made the U.S. food system safer, healthier, and more sustainable.
Civil Eats Link to Story
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A D.C. Urban Farm Takes On Urban Problems

Little more than grass used to grow on the two-acre plot behind a middle school in the District of Columbia where tomatoes, okra, and infrastructure for food entrepreneurs will begin cropping up this year. In a ward of the city with just two grocery stores serving more than 70,000 residents, fresh produce is hard to come by.
Civil Eats Link to Story
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How to Farm a Forest—and Feed a Neighborhood

A forest garden helps prove the theory that fertile, well-maintained understories can produce as many calories per acre as a field of wheat. The dollop of acorn gel with fermented sweet potato greens looked like sustenance from an episode of Survivor when a volunteer first offered it to me, plated on a single shiso leaf.
National Geographic Link to Story
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Cisco co-founder Sandy Lerner’s next big idea: Redefining road food

Before long drives, Sandy Lerner plugs a back-seat mini fridge into the cigarette outlet of her Chevy Volt and fills it with the sort of local, organic foodstuffs she has been cheerleading for two decades. The owner of the first farm in Virginia to be both certified organic and certified humane, Lerner doesn’t want to risk getting hungry on the highway, where the only option might be gas station food.
The Washington Post Link to Story
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Protecting the Spaces Where Local is Grown

There’s an imperceptible edge when you leave the city, where the skyline gives way to subdivisions and then to larger and larger patches of verdant fields. Perhaps you’ve watched with a sigh as the scenery changed on your way to a wedding, winery or U-pick patch. But if you buy produce at a farmers market, this transition area is also where it was most likely grown—and it is no small feat to ensure that produce will still be grown there in the future. This ring of land just beyond the District’s suburbs is a patchwork of open spaces surrounding still-pressing development. A growing portion of it is being protected from development by a mix of government and private programs to preserve farmland or open spaces, but their success can be subject to the whims of a new county board or the funding of a state program.
Edible DC Magazine Link to Story
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Garbage Can Teach Us a Lot About Food Waste

This month, in a first-of-its-kind study, the nonprofit Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) will begin digging through the trash bins of residents and businesses in three American cities. Because it turns out we don't actually know that much about food waste. We know that Americans waste about 36 million tons of food a year, but we don’t know the nitty-gritty details about individual behavior.
Smithsonian Magazine Link to Story
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Why This Food Bank is Turning Away Junk Food

The largest hunger-fighting organization in the nation’s capital has put food-donating retailers on notice: no more candy, sugary sodas, or sheet cakes. As key as donations are to the nonprofit’s bottom line, the Capital Area Food Bank recently told retailers that, beginning this fall, it won’t accept free food that comes at a cost to recipients—many of whom struggle with obesity and diabetes as much as hunger.
Civil Eats Link to Story
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Editor of EdibleDC's Sustainability Issue

I guest edited EdibleDC's first Sustainability issue in the Summer of 2016. The content of the entire magazine, including several pieces I wrote for it, focused on the Chesapeake Bay and how to eat with its best in mind. Flip through the issue here.
Edible DC Magazine Link to Story

About

Whitney Pipkin

Whitney Pipkin is a staff writer for the Chesapeake Bay Journal and a freelance journalist focused on food, farms and the environment. Her freelance work appears nationally in The Washington Post, National Geographic, Smithsonian Magazine and Civil Eats and in regional publications like Virginia Living, Northern Virginia and Arlington magazines and the Delmarva Farmer. Pipkin served as guest editor for Edible DC’s summer 2016 issue focused on how to eat with the Chesapeake Bay in mind.
A wife and mother based in Northern Virginia, she occasionally blogs about food, family, fitness and faith (how's that for alliteration?) at ThinkAboutEat.com.