Open-uri20161202-4-dtu6ia_thumb

Whitney Pipkin

Freelance Journalist

Washington, DC area

Whitney Pipkin

A staff writer for the Chesapeake Bay Journal
and a freelance journalist focused on food, farms
and the environment. Her freelance work appears
nationally in The Washington Post, National Geographic, Smithsonian Magazine and Civil Eats and in regional publications like Virginia Living, Northern Virginia and Arlington magazines and the Delmarva Farmer. Pipkin served as guest editor for Edible DC’s summer 2016 issue focused on how to eat with the Chesapeake Bay in mind.

Open-uri20180711-4-obkynd_profile

How the commonwealth’s brewery scene climbed the ranks

Raise a glass to the government that’s helped the state’s brewed options abound. When Jonathan Staples put a half-hearted offer on a derelict horse farm in Lucketts, turning it into a hops-growing hub for the county’s fast-growing beer industry was not in his playbook. The restaurant industry veteran, who also owns Richmond’s James River Distillery, mentioned to Loudoun County officials that he wanted to grow hops on some of the 60-acre farm, a fragrant botanical to use in the distillery’s gin.
Northern Virginia Magazine Link to Story
Open-uri20180523-4-c7ng8f_profile

Provisions: The Pure Pasty Co.

Vienna storefront reimagines what was once a simple lunch for Cornish tin miners in the 1700s. When Michael Burgess first started selling savory hand-pies out of a small storefront in Vienna, he didn’t know nostalgia for British baked goods would be so strong. “There are a lot of Anglophiles here who’ve had work experience in the U.K., with their company or the military,” says Burgess, British accent and all, who opened shop in 2010 after leaving his banking career in Cheshire, England.
Northern Virginia Magazine Link to Story
Open-uri20180523-4-12frzqm_profile

Garden Glory

The kitchen garden at Pippin Hill Farm and Vineyards is as beautiful as it is bountiful. Find Diane Burns watering the gardens that fan out from Pippin Hill Farm & Vineyards’ tasting room in North Garden, and you’re in for a treat. Pick her brain about what’s on the menu that day—odds are she plucked the ingredients from the grounds that morning—or, better yet, glean tips on how to grow food more beautifully at home.
Virginia Living Link to Story
Open-uri20180410-4-5oqlfg_profile

Managed grazing cultivates new believers

A Maryland dairyman felt like a lone wolf when he started down the decade-long path to nourishing his animals and his land differently. A Virginia cattleman said his neighbors laughed at him, and a Pennsylvania rancher agreed. No other farmer they knew was using grazing techniques this way. “Now,” said Mike Phillips, a farmer in Rockingham County, VA, “the ones who laughed are asking how we’re doing it.”.
Bay Journal Link to Story
Open-uri20180410-4-1fduqmm_profile

Food Tank Panel: Fireside Chat w/ Leading Farmers Organizations [Food Tank Summit]

Fireside Chat featuring Roger Johnson, President, National Farmers Union, Lindsey Lusher Shute, Executive Director & Co-Founder, National Young Farmers Coalition; and Mark Poeschl, CEO, National FFA Organization. Moderated by Whitney Pipkin, Reporter, the Chesapeake Bay Journal. Discussion held at the 2018 Food Tank Summit held February 28th in partnership with George Washington University, World Resources Institute, the National Farmers Union, the National FFA Organization, the National Young Farmers Coalition, Grist, Mother Jones, and Edible DC.
Food Tank Summit Link to Story
Open-uri20180125-4-17upo4a_profile

A Peas Offering For The Dairy Aisle: Can This Milk Alternative Rival The Real Deal?

The nearly $8 billion dairy-alternatives market is expected to double in size over the next four years, thanks in part to the growing number of people avoiding cow's milk. But, even if former milk drinkers can get over the differences in taste, there's one front on which the almond, cashew and coconut cannot compete with the cow: protein.
Open-uri20180410-4-3sekm2_profile

Is organic farming good for the Chesapeake?

Organic agriculture is the fastest growing sector of the food industry in the United States, and its footprint in the Chesapeake Bay watershed is growing in kind. The brand of agriculture that eschews the use of pesticides, herbicides, antibiotics and genetically engineered ingredients now makes up 20 percent of Perdue Farms’ poultry production on the Delmarva Peninsula, where the company is headquartered.
Bay Journal Link to Story
Open-uri20180208-4-1uliefg_profile

HOW THE DISTRICT IS CURBING FOOD WASTE

When Josh Singer first started turning food scraps into compost inside the Beltway, he ran into the usual suspects: rats, smells and angry neighbors. Since then, “I’ve spent the last decade trying to figure out the best ways to do it,” says Singer, a community garden specialist with the District’s Department of Parks and Recreation who saw the potential for compost to turn food waste into a resource for urban farms and gardens.
Edible DC Link to Story
Open-uri20180125-4-1p41bai_profile

'The Hardest Bakery Possible': Reinventing The Meaning Of 'Whole Grain'

Jonathan Bethony admits the breads he'll be churning out at Seylou Bakery & Mill, which just opened this month in Washington, D.C., might not appeal to everyone. The dark crusts of his pain au levain have a charred appearance and complex flavors to match their hue. Inside the loaves, a toothsome chewiness gives way to the tang of sourdough and a taste that can only be described as distinctly wheat-y.
Open-uri20171025-4-1fckjrv_profile

Why You Should Be Eating More Seafood

Steering clear of fish for environmental and health reasons? The bigger risk might be not getting enough of it. On a recent night out at an Arlington restaurant, Linda Cornish asked her server which fish dish he’d suggest, though she was already leaning toward a blueberry-sauced salmon on the menu.
Arlington Magazine Link to Story
Open-uri20170628-4-382e9u_profile

The secret sauce in this ketchup? Vegetables.

When it comes to getting the pickiest palates to try new foods, parents have a few tried-and-true tricks. They can finely chop (or, better yet, Vitamix) the new ingredient into a smoothie or casserole, only to tell the child that she actually loves beets—because she just ate one. Or they can drape the new item in that most familiar and beloved of children’s food groups: ketchup.
Northern Virginia Magazine Link to Story
Open-uri20170628-4-12d94i_profile

Dock to Dish brings seafood directly to the restaurant door

The Salt Line executive chef Kyle Bailey, right, will be the first in the Washington area to get deliveries from Dock to Dish, which applies the weekly farm box model to seafood. With Bailey are members of his kitchen team, Mike Haney and Mike O’Brien. A home cook might have been put off by the plump egg sacks that spilled out of a recent delivery of white perch.
The Washington Post Link to Story

About

Whitney Pipkin

Whitney Pipkin is a staff writer for the Chesapeake Bay Journal and a freelance journalist focused on food, farms and the environment. Her freelance work appears nationally in The Washington Post, National Geographic, Smithsonian Magazine and Civil Eats and in regional publications like Virginia Living, Northern Virginia and Arlington magazines and the Delmarva Farmer. Pipkin served as guest editor for Edible DC’s summer 2016 issue focused on how to eat with the Chesapeake Bay in mind.
A wife and mother based in Northern Virginia, she occasionally blogs about food, family, fitness and faith (how's that for alliteration?) at ThinkAboutEat.com.