Open-uri20161202-4-dtu6ia_thumb

Whitney Pipkin

Freelance Journalist

Washington, DC area

Whitney Pipkin

A staff writer for the Chesapeake Bay Journal
and a freelance journalist focused on food, farms
and the environment. Pipkin's freelance work appears
nationally in The Washington Post, National Geographic, NPR, Smithsonian Magazine and Civil Eats and in regional publications such as Virginia Living, Northern Virginia and Arlington magazines and the Delmarva Farmer. Pipkin has served as guest editor for Edible DC’s fall 2018 and summer 2016 issues.

Open-uri20181211-4-1my4qod_profile

Making outdoor spaces more inviting, accessible to all

When Kevin Bryan visits Rock Creek Park near his home in the District of Columbia, it reminds him of what’s possible. He sees families from many ethnic backgrounds hosting barbecues and birthday parties at picnic tables. Dog walkers wind their way through wooded trails while cyclists “look like they are training for the Tour de France” as they hug the curves of the park’s paved roads.
Bay Journal Link to Story
Open-uri20181023-4-2lkhj6_profile

Freshwater bivalves flexing their muscles as water filterers

Oysters are in many ways the restoration darlings of the Chesapeake Bay cleanup effort. Touted for multiple benefits — as edible, water-filtering moneymakers — oysters attract both enthusiasm and funding to promote their recovery. But the popularity of oysters often overshadows the water-cleansing role of other filter feeders such as mussels.
Bay Journal Link to Story
Open-uri20181211-4-jl8yt4_profile

Smoke & Star Power

Myron Mixon’s Pitmaster Barbeque brings the heat to Alexandria. Joe Corey is holding a slice of brisket by each end and gently tugging. He wants to show off the “accordion-like” texture and thick, pink smoke ring that, he says, would earn this piece of meat top marks in any one of the barbecue competitions he has judged over the past two decades.
Virginia Living Link to Story
Open-uri20181211-4-7pwx7q_profile

Get It While It’s Hot

If you see a plume of smoke rising on a Saturday morning in the Shenandoah Valley, follow it. Odds are it will lead you to a pile of chicken barbecued low ‘n slow over a charcoal pit by someone like Rafe Rohrer. “Roll down your window and let your nose lead you to it,” says Rohrer, 65, who’s been turning birds on the grill for years as a member of the Montezuma Ruritan Club.
Virginia Living Link to Story
Open-uri20181004-4-pv4f1t_profile

Rethinking School Lunch

We challenged three chefs-with-kids to make over school lunch—and tell us why it isn’t as easy as it sounds. Spooning rosemary-infused honey onto apple slices was getting every ounce of Lucia García’s attention, until her father reminded her of the time. “Lulu, you need to go faster,” Ruben García said, lightheartedly, reminding his 9-year-old sous chef that their meal would need to be plated in a few minutes.
Edible DC Link to Story
Open-uri20181004-4-1sxi5qr_profile

Guest Editor, Edible DC Fall 2018

I served as Guest Editor of the Fall 2018 issue of Edible DC, curating, organizing, editing and writing much of its content.
Edible DC Link to Story
Open-uri20181004-4-11flqso_profile

Invasive Species are Riding on Plastics Across the Ocean

We know plastics are as plentiful in parts of the open ocean as they are in our everyday lives. But, until recently, scientists didn’t consider that such debris could also be carrying a new wave of invasive species to the shores of the United States. Now they're finding that not only is that happening, but they suspect that some of the species will thrive.
National Geographic Link to Story
Open-uri20181004-4-6c6ypt_profile

Provisions: Mediterrafish

The new-and-improved seafood market now offers take home ready-to-eat trays. Tuba Sapanli can’t wait to show off the floors at Mediterrafish, the seafood market that recently opened at its new location in Halstead Square less than a year after its lease expired at nearby Mosaic District. Made of an aquamarine-colored epoxy, the floors are meant to make customers feel like they’re walking on water and—if aromas from the market’s restaurant didn’t already do the trick—that should cause cravings for the effortless brand of eating that accompanies a good day at the beach.
Northern Virginia Magazine Link to Story
Open-uri20181004-4-18uqgwi_profile

How Del Ray’s Dairy Godmother almost was no more

A retirement, a new owner and Barack Obama’s commemorative chair. “The fairy tale is over,” read the headline of a Washington Post article when Liz Davis announced the sobering news: The Dairy Godmother—a frozen custard shop that, after 17 years on Del Ray’s main strip, had become a backbone of the neighborhood—would not be reopening in 2017.
Northern Virginia Magazine Link to Story
Open-uri20180730-4-18322mn_profile

The elusive parent date night: Why you need it, and how to make it happen

Going on a bona fide date with my husband used to be as simple as making an Open Table reservation and taking a night off from the kitchen. But now that we have a pair of young children underfoot, getting out the door comes at such a steep cost —...
The Washington Post Link to Story
Open-uri20180711-4-obkynd_profile

How the commonwealth’s brewery scene climbed the ranks

Raise a glass to the government that’s helped the state’s brewed options abound. When Jonathan Staples put a half-hearted offer on a derelict horse farm in Lucketts, turning it into a hops-growing hub for the county’s fast-growing beer industry was not in his playbook. The restaurant industry veteran, who also owns Richmond’s James River Distillery, mentioned to Loudoun County officials that he wanted to grow hops on some of the 60-acre farm, a fragrant botanical to use in the distillery’s gin.
Northern Virginia Magazine Link to Story
Open-uri20180523-4-c7ng8f_profile

Provisions: The Pure Pasty Co.

Vienna storefront reimagines what was once a simple lunch for Cornish tin miners in the 1700s. When Michael Burgess first started selling savory hand-pies out of a small storefront in Vienna, he didn’t know nostalgia for British baked goods would be so strong. “There are a lot of Anglophiles here who’ve had work experience in the U.K., with their company or the military,” says Burgess, British accent and all, who opened shop in 2010 after leaving his banking career in Cheshire, England.
Northern Virginia Magazine Link to Story

About

Whitney Pipkin

Whitney Pipkin is a staff writer for the Chesapeake Bay Journal and a freelance journalist focused on food, farms and the environment. Her freelance work appears nationally in The Washington Post, National Geographic, Smithsonian Magazine and Civil Eats and in regional publications like Virginia Living, Northern Virginia and Arlington magazines and the Delmarva Farmer. Pipkin has served as guest editor for Edible DC’s fall 2018 and summer 2016 issues.
A wife and mother based in Northern Virginia, she occasionally blogs about food, family, fitness and faith (how's that for alliteration?) at ThinkAboutEat.com.