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Whitney Pipkin

Freelance Journalist

Washington, DC area

Whitney Pipkin

A staff writer for the Chesapeake Bay Journal
and a freelance journalist focused on food, farms
and the environment. Her freelance work appears
nationally in The Washington Post, National Geographic, Smithsonian Magazine and Civil Eats and in regional publications like Virginia Living, Northern Virginia and Arlington magazines and the Delmarva Farmer. Pipkin served as guest editor for Edible DC’s summer 2016 issue focused on how to eat with the Chesapeake Bay in mind.

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A Peas Offering For The Dairy Aisle: Can This Milk Alternative Rival The Real Deal?

The nearly $8 billion dairy-alternatives market is expected to double in size over the next four years, thanks in part to the growing number of people avoiding cow's milk. But, even if former milk drinkers can get over the differences in taste, there's one front on which the almond, cashew and coconut cannot compete with the cow: protein.
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HOW THE DISTRICT IS CURBING FOOD WASTE

When Josh Singer first started turning food scraps into compost inside the Beltway, he ran into the usual suspects: rats, smells and angry neighbors. Since then, “I’ve spent the last decade trying to figure out the best ways to do it,” says Singer, a community garden specialist with the District’s Department of Parks and Recreation who saw the potential for compost to turn food waste into a resource for urban farms and gardens.
Edible DC Link to Story
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Can the right cocktail get a girl into cigars?

Our writer ventures to the Four Seasons and Bourbon Steak to learn the fine art of cigar-and-cocktail pairing—for women.
DC Modern Luxury Link to Story
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'The Hardest Bakery Possible': Reinventing The Meaning Of 'Whole Grain'

Jonathan Bethony admits the breads he'll be churning out at Seylou Bakery & Mill, which just opened this month in Washington, D.C., might not appeal to everyone. The dark crusts of his pain au levain have a charred appearance and complex flavors to match their hue. Inside the loaves, a toothsome chewiness gives way to the tang of sourdough and a taste that can only be described as distinctly wheat-y.
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Food Access Advocates Walk The Long Walk ... To The Nearest Grocery Store

Two miles isn't too far to march for a worthy cause, as people are prone to do in the nation's capital. But it is a long way to walk for groceries. That's the impression organizers of a recent Grocery Walk in Washington, D.C.' s Anacostia neighborhood wanted to invoke when they gathered nearly 500 people to walk that far — wielding carrots and "food justice" signs — in the latest effort to address the intractable problem of food deserts.
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Why You Should Be Eating More Seafood

Steering clear of fish for environmental and health reasons? The bigger risk might be not getting enough of it. On a recent night out at an Arlington restaurant, Linda Cornish asked her server which fish dish he’d suggest, though she was already leaning toward a blueberry-sauced salmon on the menu.
Arlington Magazine Link to Story
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The Woman Who Helped the Military Cut Down on Meat

When she first started canvassing the country seven years ago, urging school districts, military bases and other big buyers to buy and serve less meat, Kristie Middleton got used to people rolling their eyes at her. Years before the federal government and physicians began suggesting that we do just that, the idea of eating fewer (or smaller) burgers was unpopular.
Civil Eats Link to Story
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Adventures in Korean Dining

If you’re looking for a dining room that’s less bare-bones with a more elevated sense of style, Kogiya Korean BBQ offers an opportunity to watch your meat cook in a more modern, industrial setting. The family-owned business recently opened a second, even larger location in Centreville. The well-reviewed Lighthouse Tofu, which specializes in galbi (marinated short ribs) and tofu soups, regularly runs deals on Groupon to lure new diners.
Arlington Magazine Link to Story
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The secret sauce in this ketchup? Vegetables.

When it comes to getting the pickiest palates to try new foods, parents have a few tried-and-true tricks. They can finely chop (or, better yet, Vitamix) the new ingredient into a smoothie or casserole, only to tell the child that she actually loves beets—because she just ate one. Or they can drape the new item in that most familiar and beloved of children’s food groups: ketchup.
Northern Virginia Magazine Link to Story
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Dock to Dish brings seafood directly to the restaurant door

The Salt Line executive chef Kyle Bailey, right, will be the first in the Washington area to get deliveries from Dock to Dish, which applies the weekly farm box model to seafood. With Bailey are members of his kitchen team, Mike Haney and Mike O’Brien. A home cook might have been put off by the plump egg sacks that spilled out of a recent delivery of white perch.
The Washington Post Link to Story
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Uyghur Dishes Are Hot at Queen Amannisa

Head to Crystal City for a taste of this lesser-known cuisine hailing from Western China. When we think of Chinese dumplings or other ubiquitous mainstays in American take-out culture, pork features prominently. That is, unless the cook behind it hails from a Chinese Muslim minority group—one with roots along the Silk Road that long ago replaced pork with a dizzying confluence of other flavors.
Arlington Magazine Link to Story
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How to Farm a Forest—and Feed a Neighborhood

A forest garden helps prove the theory that fertile, well-maintained understories can produce as many calories per acre as a field of wheat. The dollop of acorn gel with fermented sweet potato greens looked like sustenance from an episode of Survivor when a volunteer first offered it to me, plated on a single shiso leaf.
National Geographic Link to Story

About

Whitney Pipkin

Whitney Pipkin is a staff writer for the Chesapeake Bay Journal and a freelance journalist focused on food, farms and the environment. Her freelance work appears nationally in The Washington Post, National Geographic, Smithsonian Magazine and Civil Eats and in regional publications like Virginia Living, Northern Virginia and Arlington magazines and the Delmarva Farmer. Pipkin served as guest editor for Edible DC’s summer 2016 issue focused on how to eat with the Chesapeake Bay in mind.
A wife and mother based in Northern Virginia, she occasionally blogs about food, family, fitness and faith (how's that for alliteration?) at ThinkAboutEat.com.