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Whitney Pipkin

Freelance Journalist

Washington, DC area

Whitney Pipkin

A staff writer for the Chesapeake Bay Journal
and a freelance journalist whose freelance work has appeared
nationally in The Washington Post, National Geographic, NPR, Smithsonian Magazine and Civil Eats and in regional publications such as Virginia Living, Northern Virginia and Arlington magazines. Pipkin has served as guest editor for Edible DC’s summer 2016 and fall 2018 issues. She also writes content and studies for WomenWork.net.

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Dolphins 'all over the place' in Chesapeake Bay

Hundreds of Atlantic bottlenose dolphins are spending their summers in Chesapeake Bay waters. And now, with the help of crowd-sourced sightings reported each of the last four years, researchers are beginning to understand when and where these mesmeric marine mammals are likely to emerge. While dolphins have had a presence in the Bay since the late 1800s, researchers think they are arriving in larger numbers than before.
Bay Journal Link to Story
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5 Ways to Love Colleagues Remotely

Having worked for an entirely remote newsroom for nearly a decade, and I have often struggled with the how of loving my coworkers, too. When someone comes into the office stifling tears on the elevator, it’s easier to both see that there’s a need and meet it with compassion. But what does that look like when you have to read between the lines of an email to understand how someone’s doing?
The Gospel Coalition Link to Story
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Rising waters trigger change for DC's Tidal Basin

A visit to the Tidal Basin in the District of Columbia should deliver sweeping views of cherry trees heavy with pink and white blooms this time of year, drawing millions of onlookers to the concrete shorelines annually. But not this spring. For the second straight year, festival organizers are warning people to stay away, encouraging them to visit virtually.
Bay Journal Link to Story
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If Paint Chips Could Talk: Finding Eternal Significance in Our Unfinished Work

There’s a chip in the paint in a corner of my kitchen. It’s one of many on these walls, but this splotch of plaster peeking through always catches my eye as I round the corner to run out the door. I make a mental note to fix it but never quite do. And so, it remains. It reminds. Over the days and weeks and months we’ve lived in this house, that paint chip has developed a way of whispering to me.
Joyful Life Magazine Link to Story
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WORK IS GOOD

It can be hard to remember what work used to look like before this bewildering year. Did you get to serve coffee with a smile instead of a squirt of hand sanitizer? Did you get to write an entire email in one sitting without being interrupted by the children who now share your home office? As the coronavirus’ shadow continues to stretch into the future, it can leave us longing for what used to be.
Gospel Centered Discipleship Link to Story
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Microplastics: The grand reach of our tiny plastics problem

Tiny pieces of plastic are in our water, in our air, in our food, in our drinks, in our bodies, and, increasingly, in our headlines. Seemingly everywhere researchers have looked, they’ve found microplastics. I wrote a big report on the subject for the Abell Foundation.
Abell Foundation Link to Story
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Menus of the Future Should Be Difficult to Decipher

By some estimates, the United States already has lost 90 percent of the fruit and vegetable varieties that would have been available in the early 1900s. Today, humans look to four crops — wheat, rice, corn, and soybeans — to provide 60 percent of our calories, tapping into just 1 percent of the diversity still available to us.
Heated Link to Story
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Is air cleaner on other side of the block? Museum, residents to test theory

Summer temperatures in Richmond can be 16 degrees hotter in a downtown ward than in a wealthy, tree-lined neighborhood five miles away. But the citizen scientists who found that out in 2017 now hope to answer a new question: Does the quality of air that citizens breathe also depend on their ZIP codes?
Bay Journal Link to Story
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Grown-Here Grains

Turns out, it takes more than a village to resurrect a local grains economy.
Edible DC Link to Story
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This Wine Guy Is Helping Put Georgian Food on Americans’ Radar

How an American convert to Georgian orthodoxy became an evangelist for the country’s culture. Supra, the first Georgian restaurant in Washington, D.C., has lately been a focus for Noel Brockett’s traditional Georgian feasts, where friends, family, and strangers pay $125 to partake in what, to him, is a sacred act.
Heated Link to Story
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Follow These Tips to Cut Back on Food Waste

There’s something about the freshness of fall that makes us want to overhaul our kitchens. Maybe it was watching those crunchy summer greens go limp in the vegetable drawer or the realization that last week’s molded sliced turkey won’t make it into this week’s lunch boxes. Let’s not even talk about the carton of milk that curdled in the fridge during back-to-back vacations last month.
Heated Link to Story
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Your Hummus Habit Could Be Good For The Earth

Hummus is having a heyday with American consumers, and that could be as good for the soil as it is for our health. Formerly relegated to the snack aisle in U.S. grocery stores, the chickpea-based dip has long starred as the smooth centerpiece of Middle Eastern meals and, increasingly, plant-based diets.

About

Whitney Pipkin

Whitney Pipkin is a staff writer for the Chesapeake Bay Journal and a freelance journalist whose work has appeared nationally in The Washington Post, National Geographic, NPR, Smithsonian Magazine and Civil Eats and in regional publications like Virginia Living, Northern Virginia and Arlington magazines. Pipkin has served as guest editor for Edible DC’s fall 2018 and summer 2016 issues. Her cover story for Edible's spring 2019 issue won two honorable mentions from the international Hermes Creative Awards. Her work for the Bay Journal earned 1st and 2nd place in Environmental Reporting in 2019 and 2021, respectively, from the MDDC Press Association.