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Whitney Pipkin

Freelance Journalist

Washington, DC area

Whitney Pipkin

A staff writer for the Chesapeake Bay Journal
and a freelance journalist focused on food, farms
and the environment. Her freelance work appears
nationally in The Washington Post, National Geographic, Smithsonian Magazine and Civil Eats and in regional publications like Virginia Living, Northern Virginia and Arlington magazines and the Delmarva Farmer. Pipkin served as guest editor for Edible DC’s summer 2016 issue focused on how to eat with the Chesapeake Bay in mind.

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Managed grazing cultivates new believers

A Maryland dairyman felt like a lone wolf when he started down the decade-long path to nourishing his animals and his land differently. A Virginia cattleman said his neighbors laughed at him, and a Pennsylvania rancher agreed. No other farmer they knew was using grazing techniques this way. “Now,” said Mike Phillips, a farmer in Rockingham County, VA, “the ones who laughed are asking how we’re doing it.”.
Bay Journal Link to Story
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Food Tank Panel: Fireside Chat w/ Leading Farmers Organizations [Food Tank Summit]

Fireside Chat featuring Roger Johnson, President, National Farmers Union, Lindsey Lusher Shute, Executive Director & Co-Founder, National Young Farmers Coalition; and Mark Poeschl, CEO, National FFA Organization. Moderated by Whitney Pipkin, Reporter, the Chesapeake Bay Journal. Discussion held at the 2018 Food Tank Summit held February 28th in partnership with George Washington University, World Resources Institute, the National Farmers Union, the National FFA Organization, the National Young Farmers Coalition, Grist, Mother Jones, and Edible DC.
Food Tank Summit Link to Story
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Counting chickens: Poultry farms on VA Shore breed resistance

One frigid evening this winter, 170 people crowded into a high school auditorium in Onley, a small town on Virginia’s rural Eastern Shore. They didn’t come to see a student theater production or watch a basketball game between rival schools — but to talk about chickens. Many came to ply state regulators with concerns about local water quality and their health amid the poultry industry’s rapid growth on their stretch of the Delmarva Peninsula.
Bay Journal Link to Story
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Salad Bars: Coming to a Kid’s Lunchroom Near You

The 6- and 7-year-olds lining up before a newly installed salad bar in their school cafeteria are having a hard time deciding: Carrots or broccoli? Oranges or grapes? But getting to choose is the point of an effort, now well underway, to bring salad bars to every elementary school in Fairfax County.
Alexandria Living Magazine Link to Story
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A Peas Offering For The Dairy Aisle: Can This Milk Alternative Rival The Real Deal?

The nearly $8 billion dairy-alternatives market is expected to double in size over the next four years, thanks in part to the growing number of people avoiding cow's milk. But, even if former milk drinkers can get over the differences in taste, there's one front on which the almond, cashew and coconut cannot compete with the cow: protein.
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Is organic farming good for the Chesapeake?

Organic agriculture is the fastest growing sector of the food industry in the United States, and its footprint in the Chesapeake Bay watershed is growing in kind. The brand of agriculture that eschews the use of pesticides, herbicides, antibiotics and genetically engineered ingredients now makes up 20 percent of Perdue Farms’ poultry production on the Delmarva Peninsula, where the company is headquartered.
Bay Journal Link to Story
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HOW THE DISTRICT IS CURBING FOOD WASTE

When Josh Singer first started turning food scraps into compost inside the Beltway, he ran into the usual suspects: rats, smells and angry neighbors. Since then, “I’ve spent the last decade trying to figure out the best ways to do it,” says Singer, a community garden specialist with the District’s Department of Parks and Recreation who saw the potential for compost to turn food waste into a resource for urban farms and gardens.
Edible DC Link to Story
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Can the right cocktail get a girl into cigars?

Our writer ventures to the Four Seasons and Bourbon Steak to learn the fine art of cigar-and-cocktail pairing—for women.
DC Modern Luxury Link to Story
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'The Hardest Bakery Possible': Reinventing The Meaning Of 'Whole Grain'

Jonathan Bethony admits the breads he'll be churning out at Seylou Bakery & Mill, which just opened this month in Washington, D.C., might not appeal to everyone. The dark crusts of his pain au levain have a charred appearance and complex flavors to match their hue. Inside the loaves, a toothsome chewiness gives way to the tang of sourdough and a taste that can only be described as distinctly wheat-y.
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Food Access Advocates Walk The Long Walk ... To The Nearest Grocery Store

Two miles isn't too far to march for a worthy cause, as people are prone to do in the nation's capital. But it is a long way to walk for groceries. That's the impression organizers of a recent Grocery Walk in Washington, D.C.' s Anacostia neighborhood wanted to invoke when they gathered nearly 500 people to walk that far — wielding carrots and "food justice" signs — in the latest effort to address the intractable problem of food deserts.
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Why You Should Be Eating More Seafood

Steering clear of fish for environmental and health reasons? The bigger risk might be not getting enough of it. On a recent night out at an Arlington restaurant, Linda Cornish asked her server which fish dish he’d suggest, though she was already leaning toward a blueberry-sauced salmon on the menu.
Arlington Magazine Link to Story
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The Woman Who Helped the Military Cut Down on Meat

When she first started canvassing the country seven years ago, urging school districts, military bases and other big buyers to buy and serve less meat, Kristie Middleton got used to people rolling their eyes at her. Years before the federal government and physicians began suggesting that we do just that, the idea of eating fewer (or smaller) burgers was unpopular.
Civil Eats Link to Story

About

Whitney Pipkin

Whitney Pipkin is a staff writer for the Chesapeake Bay Journal and a freelance journalist focused on food, farms and the environment. Her freelance work appears nationally in The Washington Post, National Geographic, Smithsonian Magazine and Civil Eats and in regional publications like Virginia Living, Northern Virginia and Arlington magazines and the Delmarva Farmer. Pipkin served as guest editor for Edible DC’s summer 2016 issue focused on how to eat with the Chesapeake Bay in mind.
A wife and mother based in Northern Virginia, she occasionally blogs about food, family, fitness and faith (how's that for alliteration?) at ThinkAboutEat.com.