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Whitney Pipkin

Freelance Journalist

Washington, DC area

Whitney Pipkin

A staff writer for the Chesapeake Bay Journal and a freelance journalist focused on food, farms and the environment. Her freelance work appears nationally in The Washington Post, National Geographic, Smithsonian Magazine and Civil Eats and in regional publications like Virginia Living, Northern Virginia and Arlington magazines and the Delmarva Farmer. Pipkin served as guest editor for Edible DC’s summer 2016 issue focused on how to eat with the Chesapeake Bay in mind.

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Why You Should Be Eating More Seafood

Steering clear of fish for environmental and health reasons? The bigger risk might be not getting enough of it. On a recent night out at an Arlington restaurant, Linda Cornish asked her server which fish dish he’d suggest, though she was already leaning toward a blueberry-sauced salmon on the menu.
Arlington Magazine Link to Story
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The Woman Who Helped the Military Cut Down on Meat

When she first started canvassing the country seven years ago, urging school districts, military bases and other big buyers to buy and serve less meat, Kristie Middleton got used to people rolling their eyes at her. Years before the federal government and physicians began suggesting that we do just that, the idea of eating fewer (or smaller) burgers was unpopular.
Civil Eats Link to Story
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Adventures in Korean Dining

If you’re looking for a dining room that’s less bare-bones with a more elevated sense of style, Kogiya Korean BBQ offers an opportunity to watch your meat cook in a more modern, industrial setting. The family-owned business recently opened a second, even larger location in Centreville. The well-reviewed Lighthouse Tofu, which specializes in galbi (marinated short ribs) and tofu soups, regularly runs deals on Groupon to lure new diners.
Arlington Magazine Link to Story
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The secret sauce in this ketchup? Vegetables.

When it comes to getting the pickiest palates to try new foods, parents have a few tried-and-true tricks. They can finely chop (or, better yet, Vitamix) the new ingredient into a smoothie or casserole, only to tell the child that she actually loves beets—because she just ate one. Or they can drape the new item in that most familiar and beloved of children’s food groups: ketchup.
Northern Virginia Magazine Link to Story
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Dock to Dish brings seafood directly to the restaurant door

The Salt Line executive chef Kyle Bailey, right, will be the first in the Washington area to get deliveries from Dock to Dish, which applies the weekly farm box model to seafood. With Bailey are members of his kitchen team, Mike Haney and Mike O’Brien. A home cook might have been put off by the plump egg sacks that spilled out of a recent delivery of white perch.
The Washington Post Link to Story
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Uyghur Dishes Are Hot at Queen Amannisa

Head to Crystal City for a taste of this lesser-known cuisine hailing from Western China. When we think of Chinese dumplings or other ubiquitous mainstays in American take-out culture, pork features prominently. That is, unless the cook behind it hails from a Chinese Muslim minority group—one with roots along the Silk Road that long ago replaced pork with a dizzying confluence of other flavors.
Arlington Magazine Link to Story
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How to Farm a Forest—and Feed a Neighborhood

A forest garden helps prove the theory that fertile, well-maintained understories can produce as many calories per acre as a field of wheat. The dollop of acorn gel with fermented sweet potato greens looked like sustenance from an episode of Survivor when a volunteer first offered it to me, plated on a single shiso leaf.
National Geographic Link to Story
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Cisco co-founder Sandy Lerner’s next big idea: Redefining road food

Before long drives, Sandy Lerner plugs a back-seat mini fridge into the cigarette outlet of her Chevy Volt and fills it with the sort of local, organic foodstuffs she has been cheerleading for two decades. The owner of the first farm in Virginia to be both certified organic and certified humane, Lerner doesn’t want to risk getting hungry on the highway, where the only option might be gas station food.
The Washington Post Link to Story
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Protecting the Spaces Where Local is Grown

There’s an imperceptible edge when you leave the city, where the skyline gives way to subdivisions and then to larger and larger patches of verdant fields. Perhaps you’ve watched with a sigh as the scenery changed on your way to a wedding, winery or U-pick patch. But if you buy produce at a farmers market, this transition area is also where it was most likely grown—and it is no small feat to ensure that produce will still be grown there in the future. This ring of land just beyond the District’s suburbs is a patchwork of open spaces surrounding still-pressing development. A growing portion of it is being protected from development by a mix of government and private programs to preserve farmland or open spaces, but their success can be subject to the whims of a new county board or the funding of a state program.
Edible DC Magazine Link to Story
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Garbage Can Teach Us a Lot About Food Waste

This month, in a first-of-its-kind study, the nonprofit Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) will begin digging through the trash bins of residents and businesses in three American cities. Because it turns out we don't actually know that much about food waste. We know that Americans waste about 36 million tons of food a year, but we don’t know the nitty-gritty details about individual behavior.
Smithsonian Magazine Link to Story
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Why This Food Bank is Turning Away Junk Food

The largest hunger-fighting organization in the nation’s capital has put food-donating retailers on notice: no more candy, sugary sodas, or sheet cakes. As key as donations are to the nonprofit’s bottom line, the Capital Area Food Bank recently told retailers that, beginning this fall, it won’t accept free food that comes at a cost to recipients—many of whom struggle with obesity and diabetes as much as hunger.
Civil Eats Link to Story
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Editor of EdibleDC's Sustainability Issue

I guest edited EdibleDC's first Sustainability issue in the Summer of 2016. The content of the entire magazine, including several pieces I wrote for it, focused on the Chesapeake Bay and how to eat with its best in mind. Flip through the issue here.
Edible DC Magazine Link to Story

About

Whitney Pipkin

Whitney Pipkin is a staff writer for the Chesapeake Bay Journal and a freelance journalist focused on food, farms and the environment. Her freelance work appears nationally in The Washington Post, National Geographic, Smithsonian Magazine and Civil Eats and in regional publications like Virginia Living, Northern Virginia and Arlington magazines and the Delmarva Farmer. Pipkin served as guest editor for Edible DC’s summer 2016 issue focused on how to eat with the Chesapeake Bay in mind.
A wife and mother based in Northern Virginia, she occasionally blogs about food, family, fitness and faith (how's that for alliteration?) at ThinkAboutEat.com.