Open-uri20161202-4-dtu6ia_thumb

Whitney Pipkin

Freelance Journalist

Washington, DC area

Whitney Pipkin

A staff writer for the Chesapeake Bay Journal and a freelance journalist focused on food, farms and the environment. Her freelance work appears nationally in The Washington Post, National Geographic, Smithsonian Magazine and Civil Eats and in regional publications like Virginia Living, Northern Virginia and Arlington magazines and the Delmarva Farmer. Pipkin served as guest editor for Edible DC’s summer 2016 issue focused on how to eat with the Chesapeake Bay in mind.

Open-uri20170215-4-1c1kb7_profile

Food Policy in the Balance

If the past two weeks are any indication, federal policies that have been the status quo for years are now vulnerable to a stroke of the new administration’s pen. With policy changes taking place at breakneck speed in Washington, there is no certainty with respect to laws that have made the U.S. food system safer, healthier, and more sustainable.
Civil Eats Link to Story
Open-uri20170215-4-102uyov_profile

A D.C. Urban Farm Takes On Urban Problems

Little more than grass used to grow on the two-acre plot behind a middle school in the District of Columbia where tomatoes, okra, and infrastructure for food entrepreneurs will begin cropping up this year. In a ward of the city with just two grocery stores serving more than 70,000 residents, fresh produce is hard to come by.
Civil Eats Link to Story
Open-uri20161202-4-f4vrlc_profile

How to Farm a Forest—and Feed a Neighborhood

A forest garden helps prove the theory that fertile, well-maintained understories can produce as many calories per acre as a field of wheat. The dollop of acorn gel with fermented sweet potato greens looked like sustenance from an episode of Survivor when a volunteer first offered it to me, plated on a single shiso leaf.
National Geographic Link to Story
Open-uri20161202-4-1c34m5p_profile

Cisco co-founder Sandy Lerner’s next big idea: Redefining road food

Before long drives, Sandy Lerner plugs a back-seat mini fridge into the cigarette outlet of her Chevy Volt and fills it with the sort of local, organic foodstuffs she has been cheerleading for two decades. The owner of the first farm in Virginia to be both certified organic and certified humane, Lerner doesn’t want to risk getting hungry on the highway, where the only option might be gas station food.
The Washington Post Link to Story
Open-uri20161202-4-1vei588_profile

Protecting the Spaces Where Local is Grown

There’s an imperceptible edge when you leave the city, where the skyline gives way to subdivisions and then to larger and larger patches of verdant fields. Perhaps you’ve watched with a sigh as the scenery changed on your way to a wedding, winery or U-pick patch. But if you buy produce at a farmers market, this transition area is also where it was most likely grown—and it is no small feat to ensure that produce will still be grown there in the future. This ring of land just beyond the District’s suburbs is a patchwork of open spaces surrounding still-pressing development. A growing portion of it is being protected from development by a mix of government and private programs to preserve farmland or open spaces, but their success can be subject to the whims of a new county board or the funding of a state program.
Edible DC Magazine Link to Story
Open-uri20161202-4-1yx9km4_profile

Garbage Can Teach Us a Lot About Food Waste

This month, in a first-of-its-kind study, the nonprofit Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) will begin digging through the trash bins of residents and businesses in three American cities. Because it turns out we don't actually know that much about food waste. We know that Americans waste about 36 million tons of food a year, but we don’t know the nitty-gritty details about individual behavior.
Smithsonian Magazine Link to Story
Open-uri20161202-4-1ppbgmp_profile

Why This Food Bank is Turning Away Junk Food

The largest hunger-fighting organization in the nation’s capital has put food-donating retailers on notice: no more candy, sugary sodas, or sheet cakes. As key as donations are to the nonprofit’s bottom line, the Capital Area Food Bank recently told retailers that, beginning this fall, it won’t accept free food that comes at a cost to recipients—many of whom struggle with obesity and diabetes as much as hunger.
Civil Eats Link to Story
Open-uri20170112-4-1bq4cxp_profile

Editor of EdibleDC's Sustainability Issue

I guest edited EdibleDC's first Sustainability issue in the Summer of 2016. The content of the entire magazine, including several pieces I wrote for it, focused on the Chesapeake Bay and how to eat with its best in mind. Flip through the issue here.
Edible DC Magazine Link to Story
Open-uri20161202-4-yhqtk0_profile

The Whole Hog: A Waste Not, Want Not Approach to Local Food

With breeds like Ossabaw, Mulefoot and Large Black, Spring House Farm’s pigs are the makings of farm-to-table fables. But trucking the immense black pigs from the farm in Lovettsville to the butcher to the chefs—most of whom wanted chops, not noses or tails—became a money-losing endeavor a few years in, says farmer Andrew Crush.
Northern Virginia Magazine Link to Story
Open-uri20161202-4-s2wgk5_profile

How ethics guidelines can catch freelancers by surprise

Freelancers aspiring to write for NPR might start by taking a spin through its ethics handbook, lengthy as it is. That’s because the “living document,” available on NPR’s website, pertains to contract workers as much as staffers — and could have implications for freelancers’ broader suites of work, says Mark Memmott, who oversees the 20-section handbook as standards and practices editor.
Current & Contently Link to Story
Open-uri20161202-4-1sv7qul_profile

Opening Act: The Bittersweet Intro of an Aperitif

slightly bitter, slightly sweet, fully invigorating—of the aperitif. Just as taste buds grow to love the bitter and bracing later in life, our cocktail culture is coming of age—and seeking something a bit more bittersweet. The signposts are appearing on menus and behind bars across the region under a categorical heading the French tell us we’ve been ignoring for far too long: Aperitifs.
Virginia Living Link to Story
Open-uri20161123-4-1qeu14n_profile

For a food writer, infant’s peanut allergy is particularly hard to swallow

Peanut butter got me through that dreaded first trimester of pregnancy. When all other protein sources made my stomach churn, I spooned it onto bananas, toast and oatmeal. I even put it on carrots. I ate more than I usually would, partly because I love it (eat what you crave, right?) and partly because I’d read that early introduction of allergy-inducing foods — even in utero — could help prevent allergies later.
The Washington Post Link to Story

About

Whitney Pipkin

Whitney Pipkin is a staff writer for the Chesapeake Bay Journal and a freelance journalist focused on food, farms and the environment. Her freelance work appears nationally in The Washington Post, National Geographic, Smithsonian Magazine and Civil Eats and in regional publications like Virginia Living, Northern Virginia and Arlington magazines and the Delmarva Farmer. Pipkin served as guest editor for Edible DC’s summer 2016 issue focused on how to eat with the Chesapeake Bay in mind.
A wife and mother based in Northern Virginia, she occasionally blogs about food, family, fitness and faith (how's that for alliteration?) at ThinkAboutEat.com.