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Whitney Pipkin

Freelance Journalist

Washington, DC area

Whitney Pipkin

A staff writer for the Chesapeake Bay Journal
and a freelance journalist focused on food, farms
and the environment. Pipkin's freelance work appears
nationally in The Washington Post, National Geographic, NPR, Smithsonian Magazine and Civil Eats and in regional publications such as Virginia Living, Northern Virginia and Arlington magazines and the Delmarva Farmer. Pipkin has served as guest editor for Edible DC’s fall 2018 and summer 2016 issues.

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Grown-Here Grains

Turns out, it takes more than a village to resurrect a local grains economy.
Edible DC Link to Story
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This Wine Guy Is Helping Put Georgian Food on Americans’ Radar

How an American convert to Georgian orthodoxy became an evangelist for the country’s culture. Supra, the first Georgian restaurant in Washington, D.C., has lately been a focus for Noel Brockett’s traditional Georgian feasts, where friends, family, and strangers pay $125 to partake in what, to him, is a sacred act.
Heated Link to Story
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Follow These Tips to Cut Back on Food Waste

There’s something about the freshness of fall that makes us want to overhaul our kitchens. Maybe it was watching those crunchy summer greens go limp in the vegetable drawer or the realization that last week’s molded sliced turkey won’t make it into this week’s lunch boxes. Let’s not even talk about the carton of milk that curdled in the fridge during back-to-back vacations last month.
Heated Link to Story
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Your Hummus Habit Could Be Good For The Earth

Hummus is having a heyday with American consumers, and that could be as good for the soil as it is for our health. Formerly relegated to the snack aisle in U.S. grocery stores, the chickpea-based dip has long starred as the smooth centerpiece of Middle Eastern meals and, increasingly, plant-based diets.
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Livestock fencing needs to pick up pace in Shenandoah Valley

Time seems to slow down in the Shenandoah Valley, where the pastoral act of raising livestock for a living appears as unchanged by the years as the emerald-green hills on either side of Interstate 81. But almost a decade has passed since Virginia first set a goal to have farmers build fences along nearly every Chesapeake Bay-bound stream that livestock could otherwise access in the state.
Bay Journal Link to Story
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How to eat with your morals, while staying on budget

CAVA, Taco Bamba and Haute Dogs have figured out the formula to provide health-conscious, fast-casual food at an affordable price. Technically, people could braise short ribs, grill chicken souvlaki and roast a seasonal mix of vegetables by 5 p.m. so their kids can have choices on the way to hockey practice—but it’s not likely.
Northern Virginia Magazine Link to Story
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The South had something worth saving

Rick Middleton didn’t fancy himself an environmental lawyer when he graduated from Yale Law School in 1971. That category didn’t exist. The United States had only just commemorated its first Earth Day, and the future founder of the Southern Environmental Law Center still felt like a fish out of water in New England’s semi-industrial corridor, pining for the bucolic valleys around his Alabama hometown of Birmingham.
Bay Journal Link to Story
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The Lucketts Ladies

“Sorry for the mess,” Suzanne “Suze” Eblen says as I step across the threshold into the Design House at The Old Lucketts Store north of Leesburg. “We’re in the throes of redecorating.”. I chuckle, imagining her saying the same phrase any day of the week about the house she and her business partner, Amy Whyte, have overhauled 140 times so far, selling everything within its walls at weekend events 10 times a year.
Virginia Living Link to Story
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White Horse Mountain worth the millions paid to protect it

Hugging the slow s-curves of road winding into a mountainous sliver of West Virginia’s Hampshire County, I remembered why they call this portion of the Chesapeake Bay watershed “wild” — and why clean water advocates were desperate to keep it that way.
Bay Journal Link to Story
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Female (Up)Rising - Cover Story

How women scaling the ranks could make the industry a friendlier place to work — and not just for themselves.
Edible DC Link to Story
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When Self-Pity Raids Fellowship

I don’t say it as I walk through the doors of our lovely church and greet our fellow saints every Sunday morning. if I got the kids out the door and the limping dog fed and the home group meal made while my husband was off at another drill weekend—it’s likely I’m thinking it. For years, I thought the problem with this scenario was that the God of the universe didn’t swoop down to help everything go perfectly on Sunday morning.
Deeply Rooted Magazine Link to Story
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Virginia Gets Its First Sake Brewery

Room temperature, in a shot glass, at a sushi bar. That’s the way most Americans have experienced sake, a Japanese alcohol made from fermented rice. But the owners of the North American Sake Brewery, which opened in Charlottesville this year, want to change that. “When you have really good, cold, craft sake, it’s just eye opening,” says Jeremy Goldstein, the brewery’s co-founder.
Virginia Living Link to Story

About

Whitney Pipkin

Whitney Pipkin is a staff writer for the Chesapeake Bay Journal and a freelance journalist focused on food, farms and the environment. Her freelance work appears nationally in The Washington Post, National Geographic, Smithsonian Magazine and Civil Eats and in regional publications like Virginia Living, Northern Virginia and Arlington magazines and the Delmarva Farmer. Pipkin has served as guest editor for Edible DC’s fall 2018 and summer 2016 issues.
A wife and mother based in Northern Virginia, she occasionally blogs about food, family, fitness and faith (how's that for alliteration?) at ThinkAboutEat.com.