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Whitney Pipkin

Freelance Journalist

Washington, DC area

Whitney Pipkin

A staff writer for the Chesapeake Bay Journal and a freelance journalist focused on food, farms and the environment. Her freelance work appears nationally in The Washington Post, National Geographic, Smithsonian Magazine and Civil Eats and in regional publications like Virginia Living, Northern Virginia and Arlington magazines and the Delmarva Farmer. Pipkin served as guest editor for Edible DC’s summer 2016 issue focused on how to eat with the Chesapeake Bay in mind.

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Cisco co-founder Sandy Lerner’s next big idea: Redefining road food

Before long drives, Sandy Lerner plugs a back-seat mini fridge into the cigarette outlet of her Chevy Volt and fills it with the sort of local, organic foodstuffs she has been cheerleading for two decades. The owner of the first farm in Virginia to be both certified organic and certified humane, Lerner doesn’t want to risk getting hungry on the highway, where the only option might be gas station food.
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For a food writer, infant’s peanut allergy is particularly hard to swallow

Peanut butter got me through that dreaded first trimester of pregnancy. When all other protein sources made my stomach churn, I spooned it onto bananas, toast and oatmeal. I even put it on carrots. I ate more than I usually would, partly because I love it (eat what you crave, right?) and partly because I’d read that early introduction of allergy-inducing foods — even in utero — could help prevent allergies later.
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Is Georgian cuisine the next big thing? These enthusiasts hope so.

Letting a glass of orange wine breathe at his elbow, Mamuka Tsereteli scoured the Japanese menu at Daikaya for something to accompany it. The wine from Georgia (the former Soviet republic, not the American state) looked the shade of brandy but tasted nothing like it, with tongue-smacking tannins, dried apricot and golden raisins overwhelming any anticipated sweetness.
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Parents and toddlers have a right to vacations and meals out, too

I wasn’t sure what to call it when the Airbnb host told us, after accepting our reservation — and noticing that we’d have a toddler in tow — that my husband and I had better be “excessively diligent.”. The last time she had a toddler stay in their spare room, she mentioned ominously, she had a broken wine glass and merlot stains to show for it.
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Maybe this is how ‘artisanal’ foods can finally spread the wealth

Plenty of kale fronds were scorched in pursuit of the perfect chip before Francisco Rivera got the recipe just right. Now, the 26-year-old can rip the largest leaves into uniform shards while holding a conversation about packaging. He can eyeball the right amount of blended oil and Italian spice to rub into their crevices before popping them into a convection oven to get impossibly crisp in just 20 minutes.
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Why a bright idea for growing food in the city had to move . . . to the country

An unseasonably warm sun beamed heat into the refurbished greenhouse more than an hour outside Washington, making it feel like a place where tomatoes might not mind growing, even in mid-December. The plants already reached waist high, rooted in plastic-sheathed blocks of finely woven rock that allow almost all the water to be reused in this hydroponic system.
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What keeps ‘The Splendid Table’ cooking after 20 years

‘If you watch, she’ll start salivating,” Sally Swift says from a control room in the Minnesota Public Radio studios. “It’s really funny.”. She’s talking about Lynne Rossetto Kasper, who on the other side of a large window is settling into a detailed description of a marinated chicken dish that Carly from Chantilly, Va., could prepare in a small kitchen.
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Why entrepreneurs are suddenly finding the beauty in ugly produce

Their businesses work to decrease food waste in the Washington area, from left: Kelsey Albright, Aida Basnight, Joanne Fuller and owner Elizabeth Bennett of Fruitcycle; John Zamora and Evan Lutz, owners of Hungry Harvest; Philip Wong and Ann Yang, owners of Misfit Juicery. Misshapen potatoes, multi-pronged carrots and past-their-prime apples — rebranded as “cosmetically challenged” and “beautiful in their own way” — are coming into vogue.
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The love-hate relationship with my breast pump

At three weeks old, my daughter took her first bottle of breast milk at a coffee shop while I got a much-needed haircut next door. When my husband sent me a photo of her guzzling it down, I cheered. I even sipped a celebratory shot of tequila (my Honduran hairdresser offers them on every visit) and forwarded the picture to my mom.
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How do you keep Julia Child’s legacy alive? Pay it forward.

The foundation Child established in the 1990s is launching an annual award in her honor that it hopes will rival the existing suite of culinary accolades in its singularity and prestige. The first Julia Child Award will be bestowed this August on one person whose work in the culinary realm is, to put it succinctly, uniquely Julia-like.
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Taste preference is the subject of a new book by a Silver Spring writer

Flaking a bite onto his fork, John McQuaid took in the sight of the whole rockfish before him, its eyeballs, fins and tail visible beneath a chili-dotted red curry sauce. “This is an example of something I would never have eaten as a child,” he said, noting the way the Thai lunch at Soi 38 stared back at him from a fish-shaped plate.
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‘Top Chef’ contestants: Nothing prepares you for the show's surprises

What do chefs George Pagonis and Joy Crump think viewers will remember most about the upcoming season of “Top Chef”? “George’s hair,” Crump said with a chuckle during a three-way call with her fellow contestant, referring to the slicked-back mane that hints at Pagonis’s Greek roots. “I think you’ve got me beat on that one,” Pagonis bantered back to Crump, whose face is framed by a good-size Afro.
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About

Whitney Pipkin

Whitney Pipkin is a staff writer for the Chesapeake Bay Journal and a freelance journalist focused on food, farms and the environment. Her freelance work appears nationally in The Washington Post, National Geographic, Smithsonian Magazine and Civil Eats and in regional publications like Virginia Living, Northern Virginia and Arlington magazines and the Delmarva Farmer. Pipkin served as guest editor for Edible DC’s summer 2016 issue focused on how to eat with the Chesapeake Bay in mind.
A wife and mother based in Northern Virginia, she occasionally blogs about food, family, fitness and faith (how's that for alliteration?) at ThinkAboutEat.com.